Ch at xx

Many of the words that start with ⟨x⟩ are of Greek origin, or standardized trademarks (Xerox) or acronyms (XC). XMIT for transmit, XFER for transfer), "cross-" (e.g.

X-ing for crossing, XREF for cross-reference), "Christ-" as shorthand for the labarum (e.g.

The other kind of ⟨h⟩ is called h aspiré ("aspirated '⟨h⟩'", though it is not normally aspirated phonetically), and does not allow elision or liaison.

For example in le homard ('the lobster') the article le remains unelided, and may be separated from the noun with a bit of a glottal stop.

In mathematical typesetting, x meaning an algebraic variable is normally in italic type (), partly to avoid confusion with the multiplication symbol.

In fonts containing both x (the letter) and × (the multiplication sign), the two glyphs are dissimilar.

Ch at xx-49Ch at xx-31

The modern tradition of using x to represent an unknown was introduced by René Descartes in La Géométrie (1637).

Initial is often not pronounced in the weak form of some function words including had, has, have, he, her, him, his, and in some varieties of English (including most regional dialects of England and Wales) it is often omitted in all words (see '⟨h⟩'-dropping).

It was formerly common for an rather than a to be used as the indefinite article before a word beginning with ('heighten'), the second ⟨h⟩ is mute for most speakers outside of Switzerland.

In 1901, a spelling reform eliminated the silent ⟨h⟩ in nearly all instances of ⟨th⟩ in native German words such as thun ('to do') or Thür ('door').

It has been left unchanged in words derived from Greek, such as in oral traditions that merged both sounds (the latter originarily represented by ⟨x⟩ instead) e.g.

16 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*